Synthetic lethality as drug discovery platform

One of the features of drug design in the -omics era is the shift from target- and structure-based to function-based drug discovery, when the active compound is identified simultaneously or before the mechanism of action.

A new report in Nature Chemical Biology describes an interesting blend of small molecule high-throughput screening with genetic screening via synthetic lethality. As one might guess, the approach is dealing with cellular death. Traditional ‘simple’ genetic screen identifies individual genes that are critical for cell survival. The principle of synthetic lethality is somewhat different. Scientists seek gene pairs or networks that are crucial in combination but which could be silenced individually without jeopardizing essential cellular functions. Previously it was applied for the discovery of anticancer therapeutics. This time the team from Harvard Medical School aimed at Staphyllococcus aureus. Continue reading “Synthetic lethality as drug discovery platform”